Climate change is one of the most challenging political questions of our time, and how to handle it remains divise. However, poll after poll seems to point a picture of concern among many Americans, including right here in Kerrville. 

We asked the question last week about the issue and 45% of our respondents said they felt it was happening, while 48% said no way or it’s a myth. The poll was spurred by a scientific one conducted by the University of Texas and The Texas Tribune that found 66% of Texans said they had concerns about climate change. 

In our poll, decidedly not scientific, we asked: I’m certain it’s happening; No way the science isn’t there; It’s a myth; Why is it so cold?; It’s always hot in Texas in the summer. Only 7% participated in the final two questions or answers. 

QUESTION THIS WEEK: HOLIDAY SHOPPING

The Christmas season is upon us and that means shopping. 

Last month, consulting firm Accenture released its annual holiday shopping outlook and it found that people still want an in-store experience. 

“The survey results go against the hype surrounding the demise of physical stores, with respondents saying they expect to do half of their holiday shopping this year in a store or mall, on average,” Accenture said in a press release. “Stores play an important role when it comes to inspiring shoppers’ gift ideas. In addition, consumers were significantly more likely to say that, after seeing an item in a store, they would purchase the item in the store rather than searching online for a better price and purchasing online.”

Another consulting firm, Deloitte, sees little change in where people will spend their money and that the value of the online experience is still higher than a traditional store. Deloitte estimates that 59% will spend online vs. 36% in a store — a number that is basically flat since 2017.

So, we are asking: Where will you primarily make your holiday purchases in 2019? 

  • Right here in Kerrville?
  • Hitting the road to San Antonio? 
  • Austin? 
  • Online? 

PRESIDENTIAL NUMBERS GAME

While South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg made big strides in Iowa, where he was named the Democrat front runner, former Vice President Joe Biden is still leading in most of the race to earn the Democrat nomination in 2020. 

Politics website The Hill reported that Biden also leads among Latinos in Texas, with 33% support, more than double that of second-place Warren, who’s at 16%. Sanders is in third place with 11% support. The Mason-Dixon poll found that 66% of Hispanics wanted to replace President Trump. 

The latest YouGov.com poll, however, is starting to paint a positive picture for Trump in Texas and the last polling cycle showed the president winning over all Democrat contenders by about 5-7% points. This poll, which was conducted at the end of October, was of 1,200 registered voters statewide. 

On the national level, Trump is trailing badly to Biden, but website RealClearPolitics had an interesting take on Sunday about Trump’s pathway to victory: 

“Two polls released recently reveal an emerging scenario for the 2020 presidential election that both Democrats and Republicans should view with horror,” wrote authors Reed Hundt and James K. Glassman, who both served in the federal government. “It is now evident that if the election were held tomorrow, Donald Trump would probably lose the popular vote in a landslide but still win a second term.”

The two writers pontificate that Trump could still win a decisive victory in the Electoral College, but not win the popular vote, which they both consider a bad thing for the United States. However, they see the possibility coming down to swing states of Arizona, Michigan, Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. 

“If the election were held today, these polls indicate that Trump would lose by 10 million to 15 million popular votes – a margin even greater than the crushing defeat of Jimmy Carter by Ronald Reagan in 1980,” Hundt and Glassman wrote. “But, unlike Carter, Trump would have about an even chance of winning a majority of electoral votes and becoming president.”

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