Hearts in recovery have a new facility to help them in their healing process. Peterson Health opened a new cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation facility with all-new equipment to help monitor healing patients while they exercise.

“(This facility is) excellent,” said Stan Irvin, a patient who uses the facility. “The other place was overcrowded. They just had too much going on and too many people.”

The cardio program has been around since February 2016 in the Ambulatory Care Center, said Jana Cain, a registered nurse in the cardio department. But as the program grew, it made more sense to have the facility closer to the cardiologist offices. It opened June 17.

Care Center, said Jana Cain, a registered nurse in the cardio department. But as the program grew, it made more sense to have the facility closer to the cardiologist offices. It opened June 17.

“I think it has allowed us a little more time to spend with our patients,” Cain said. “Over at the ACC we had grown so big.”

The facility sees about 70 patients that come in and exercise two to three times per week, each exercising for about 45 minutes to an hour. The patients usually come in for 36 sessions before they “graduate” and can move on to exercising independently.

Irvin, who suffered from a heart attack in February, is almost done with the program, only needing two more sessions out of 33 before graduating.

“My stamina has increased 100-fold,” he said, adding with a smile that he can out-exercise his 58-year-old son.

Cain said cardiac rehabilitation is for patients who have had a heart attack, bypass surgery, stints put in their heart or any other kind of cardiovascular event. They come to exercise at the rehab facility to work on strengthening the heart muscle while also having the security of heart monitors and professionals to make sure they don’t overdo it.

“The goal of aerobic exercise is to get your heart rate up,” Cain said. “Your heart is a muscle. If you’re getting that heart rate up, then that’s exercising that heart muscle. If you have a stronger heart muscle, then your heart can function better and get that blood circulating.”

That’s why doing some things that might seem like exercise — like walking to the mailbox — aren’t actually effective at helping hearts; they don’t get the heart rate up. Cain said a good level of heart rate while exercising is a regular heart rate plus 30.

“Everybody’s (regular heart rate) is different,” Cain said. “It depends on their medication, how conditioned they are. It’s just like blood pressure. ... Their height, their weight — everything factors into it.”

The facility also has classes about healthy habits, like healthy cooking and nutrition, and educates people about medicine, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes and other heart health-related topics.

“Our goal is to teach them to continue to exercise, what to look for and how to do it so that they

don’t lose the progress that they made,” Cain said.

Elsie Anderson, a pulmonary patient using the facility, said she likes the new place.

“It’s very nice,” Anderson said. “All the people here are so nice. They really are very helpful.”

“I think it has allowed us a little more time to spend with our patients,” Cain said. “Over at the ACC we had grown so big.”

The facility sees about 70 patients that come in and exercise two to three times per week, each exercising for about 45 minutes to an hour. The patients usually come in for 36 sessions before they “graduate” and can move on to exercising independently.

Irvin, who suffered from a heart attack in February, is almost done with the program, only needing two more sessions out of 33 before graduating.

“My stamina has increased 100-fold,” he said, adding with a smile that he can out-exercise his 58-year-old son.

Cain said cardiac rehabilitation is for patients who have had a heart attack, bypass surgery, stints put in their heart or any other kind of cardiovascular event. They come to exercise at the rehab facility to work on strengthening the heart muscle while also having the security of heart monitors and professionals to make sure they don’t overdo it.

“The goal of aerobic exercise is to get your heart rate up,” Cain said. “Your heart is a muscle. If you’re getting that heart rate up, then that’s exercising that heart muscle. If you have a stronger heart muscle, then your heart can function better and get that blood circulating.”

That’s why doing some things that might seem like exercise — like walking to the mailbox — aren’t actually effective at helping hearts; they don’t get the heart rate up. Cain said a good level of heart rate while exercising is a regular heart rate plus 30.

“Everybody’s (regular heart rate) is different,” Cain said. “It depends on their medication, how conditioned they are. It’s just like blood pressure. ... Their height, their weight — everything factors into it.”

The facility also has classes about healthy habits, like healthy cooking and nutrition, and educates people about medicine, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes and other heart health-related topics.

“Our goal is to teach them to continue to exercise, what to look for and how to do it so that they don’t lose the progress that they made,” Cain said.

Elsie Anderson, a pulmonary patient using the facility, said she likes the new place.

“It’s very nice,” Anderson said. “All the people here are so nice. They really are very helpful.”

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