Paul, in his letter to the Ephesians, minces no words. These are people he loves, and he admonishes them in no uncertain terms about the contrast between the old ways of living and the new life in Christ.

In Matthew 4, we read that the crowds followed Jesus as he taught and healed them. In chapter 5, which includes what are called the Beatitudes, we see that Jesus seeks to distance himself from the following mob, to get together with his disciples to teach them about how to behave in their ow…

As the Lenten season ends with “Holy Week,” which began last Sunday, Palm Sunday, Christians have accompanied Jesus on his journey to Jerusalem, including the last supper with his disciples on Thursday, when churches observe the sacrament of communion — (this year individually at home).

This Sunday, March 29, the Fifth Sunday of Lent, marks 21 days before Easter. In some traditions, it is observed as a time to rejoice, similar to the third Sunday of Advent, when the pink candle signifies a time where, in the midst of penitence and somberness, Christians are reminded to rejo…

In the 17th Chapter of the Gospel of John, Jesus prays to God for his disciples with gratitude and encouragement as follows:

The beautiful and well-known 500-acre Mo-Ranch camp and conference center in Hunt had a problem. Children from the Rio Grande Valley have not been attending its camps in any recognizable numbers. Why?

The unusual term “Baccalaureate,” originally referring to the bachelor degree conferred on graduates from colleges and universities, is commonly used for a service of worship and spiritual commitment of graduating seniors of high schools and colleges including a sermon of challenge and commitment.

As we approach the Third Sunday in our Lenten pilgrimage with Jesus as he approaches the cross, I have been sharing a specific passage of scripture each Friday as food for thought regarding the identity of and our relation to the God humanity has sought through history.

On “Shrove Tuesday,” the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, the youth of the First Presbyterian Church, together with their parents and leaders, put on an outstanding pancake and sausage supper.

Since before the founding of our nation, chaplains have served in the military alongside those who have fought to defend our country and the values we cherish. As agents of peace and comfort always present in the most trying of circumstances, these courageous persons have been, and continue …

Perhaps the most familiar and beloved passage in the Bible is John 3:16: “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.”

Peter Marty, publisher and editor of Christian Century Magazine and pastor of a large Lutheran Church in Iowa, wrote in a recent editorial that no one is born with depth of character.

Perhaps you have noticed that I have recently shared and emphasized whole specific passages of scripture in many of my devotions, among other interesting stories and important church and other faith matters. It is becoming increasingly evident that Christians in our American culture often ne…

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once famously said that we have nothing to fear but fear itself. Having said that in another era, today gives the world much to fear.

Way back in the Old Testament, the prophet Isaiah envisioned in Isaiah chapter 32 and elsewhere a government of justice and righteousness.

A very good and caring lady, a church member and an active and caring person in the community who served the poor and needy in many ways, was asked by someone who did not know her but admired her very much, “Are you a Christian?”

A World Council of Churches conference — representing churches around the world — was attended recently by more than 1,000 delegates at this gathering of its Commission on World Mission and Evangelism, which meets every 10 years and was held in Arusha, Tanzania. The theme of the conferences …

When we ask ourselves about what is the church’s mission, we need to ask whose mission is it. A recent book, “Participating in God’s Mission,” by Craig Van Gelder and Dwight Zscheile, reverses the field of mission. 

I share forthwith some poignant words from an excellent little Catholic book from Ignatius Press titled “The Evangelizing Parish,” by Francis Cardinal Arinze. The critical mandate for all Christian churches, Catholic and Protestant, is to be evangelistic first and foremost.

A recent Pew Research Center survey of more than 4,700 U.S. adults found that most Americans (80 percent) believe in God. However, only a little over half (56 percent) believe in God as revealed in the Bible. And 10 percent of respondents do not believe in a higher power or spiritual force.

In the beginning: God. As the symbolic and poetic vision of the book of Genesis clearly affirms, all of existence is the creation of God.

The excellent Catholic publication “First Things” declares its purpose as “Shining the light of truth through the fog of secular culture.”

As we look over this past week, we recall times of unspeakable disaster in the 9/11 event and its subsequent consequences. The ongoing political fiasco and its national and worldwide dangers and implications continues to escalate. And now the destructive results of hurricanes and flooding, b…

Are all Christians priests? This assertion is surprising to most Protestants. We are used to recognizing Roman Catholic and Episcopalian clergy as priests. Priests hold a revered place in these traditions, distinguishing them from lay Christians and church members. They are recognized as hav…

Delores Porter and her husband were forced to abandon their modest one-story house in Princeville, North Carolina, after floodwaters from Hurricane Matthew rose 10 feet. Princeville with a population of 2,080. The nation’s oldest town incorporated by freed slaves had to be evacuated by its m…

As I have mentioned before in some of my columns, many of the Psalms are among my favorite passages of scripture. They express confidence and faith amidst rampant evil and arrogance, which pervades our culture and world today, even as David experienced in his time when he wrote these words o…

Now that the Fourth of July festivities are over, it would be well for us to take the time and opportunity for reflection and prayer as we remember with gratitude the brave action of the Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. On that date, the delegates voted to officially adopt the De…

Many of us remember the term “backslider” to describe those who having been brought up in Sunday school and church, recalling happy and fulfilling times, but after growing up and busily raising families and pursuing jobs, have abandoned the importance of growing in their family’s spiritual d…